Why Fear Is A Good Thing

William Wilson ThinkingI know you are thinking, “How can fear be a good thing?” You probably thinking of all the negative things that come with fear. Anxiety, nervousness, lack of sleep, on edge, and being in a constant state of uncertainty. Or as I like to call it, “ENTREPRENEURSHIP”. I know right about now, someone is thinking 2 Timothy 1:7 (For God hasn’t given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.) And I am not one to go against the Bible. But before you get on your holy high horse, we ALL do PLENTY of things on a regular basis that God didn’t give us a spirit of.  So let’s not be sanctimonious here please.

Fear is good for 3 reasons:

1. Fear makes you pay attention. When you are scared, you pay attention to everything around you. You look for anything out of place. You make sure you cover all of the vulnerabilities that you can. You make sure to dot your I’s, and cross your T’s. Kind of like when the police are behind you. You make sure you drive the speed limit, use your turn signals, have on your seat belt, and you don’t text and drive.

2. Fear makes you appreciate things. When you fear losing something, you pay more attention to it. It moves up your priority list. You either handle it yourself, or you put your BEST person on it. When you’re afraid you are about to lose your best client (or your significant other) you make sure to do everything you can to keep them. You stop focusing on how much more you can add to your portfolio, and focus on paying attention to what you already have.  After all, adding new customers, while losing old ones, is a net zero gain.

3. Last and most importantly. Fear means you’re taking a chance. If you start  a new venture and you’re not afraid it will fail, then you aren’t really taking a risk. You’re just playing it safe. You’re not making moves, you’re just treading water. That’s not to insult anyone. It’s just the truth. It isn’t always a bad thing. You shouldn’t try to always hit home runs. Sometimes you just need to get on base. But if you NEVER feel afraid of failure, embarrassment, or losing; you haven’t fully invested yourself in it.

Life is about taking chances. That’s why it’s a risk. I have been more successful than I deserve to be. And I fail. I FAIL A LOT! Every time I launch a new brand, begin a new initiative, or try an idea- I am scared to death it won’t work. The night before my William Wilson Celebrity Invitational Party I can barely sleep. That entire day I’m nervous people won’t show up. Then I’m nervous they won’t have a good time. I’m nervous the next day it’s going to rain, and people won’t get to play golf. My stomach is in knots that the celebrities that graciously give their time to come play won’t have a good time and won’t come back. Every year, God blesses me with a successful event, and the next year I’m just as nervous as before. This is not just the life of an entrepreneur. It’s life period. Take some chances. Get out of your comfort zone. Take a risk. Will you fail? Maybe. Can you guarantee your risk will pay off? No. But when you take a big chance, and you’re worried it won’t work. And you pray and you pray; and when the time comes, it works. There is no other feeling on Earth like it. Give it a shot. It just may work. Until next time…..

God bless and dress well.

William Wilson, CEO

William Wilson Clothing.

Follow William on Twitter: @TheClothier

Help Me Enhance Your “Perspective”

I created The William Wilson Perspective, with one goal in mind; “Help as many people as I can”. I like to think that I have done that, but I want to be able to do more. So, in an attempt to be more interactive, I’m changing The Perspective from a text only format to a video/ text format. I will be answering questions, on video, that I receive from you via my Facebook fan page, or Twitter. So please send your questions to me. You can ask about anything, business, branding, lifestyle, entrepreneurship, how to dress, or just the way I approach life. As long as they aren’t too personal, I will answer just about any type of question.

I look forward to using this format to help as many people as possible. Please understand I may not be able to answer ever question that I’m asked. Maybe some of you will have the same question, which I often encounter. But I will do everything I can to answer them as I can.

This post in an example of  the new “vlog” format. Archives of posts will be here at The William Wilson Perspective. But they will also be available on my YouTube channel ” The William Wilson. Feel free to subscribe to both my blog and my YouTube channel. I hope to hear from you soon. Until next time….

God bless and dress well.

William Wilson, CEO

William Wilson Clothing

My Amazing Trip To Food Lion

William Wilson ThinkingIt’s awesome how God always knows when to send someone into your life at JUST the right time. That happened to me today, and I am so grateful. If you know me, you know I’m not one to get down often. I’m usually pretty positive, and pride myself on being optimistic. Today, (July 16) I was finding it extremely difficult to do so. That changed this afternoon. Let me expound.

I believe in listening to both sides of any story. This includes the Zimmerman case. So I’ve been listening to WBT, ALL DAY, to hear the “Justice was served” side of the Zimmerman story. And honestly, my blood has been BOILING. At times, it took intense and immediate prayer to not allow my heart to be filled with hate. I could feel hatred building up inside me. It felt like poison infecting my body. I like people, I don’t care what color, religion, sexual orientation or political affiliation. I just like people. So to feel these feelings are just foreign to me. Let me clarify something. I wasn’t angry at white people. I haven’t been, and I won’t be. I was angry with the people calling in. But I wasn’t angry because of their opinions. But I was angry for 2 reasons.

1. I listened to caller after caller, and I realized they have strong opinions about why “black people” are upset. But they really have NO IDEA why people are upset. They are putting their own reasons to this story, and then commenting on it. To his credit, the DJ (I think it was Keith Larson) that was on called them out when they were wrong, and sarcastically ridiculed them, though I’m not sure some of them even realized it.

2. Because this is being categorized as “black anger”. This isn’t a “black anger” issue. This is a multi-cultural anger issue. All races are angry, just not all the people of those races. I blame the media for much of that. As I watch the post-verdict coverage, it seems 99% of the Team Trayvon is black, and 99% of Team Zimmerman is white. That is inaccurate, and just exacerbates the racial bias, and rhetoric.

Anyway, I was at Food Lion, on Beatties Ford Rd. My first time ever going there. (for those not familiar with Beatties Ford Rd, it’s in a predominantly black area of Charlotte). While I was shopping, I noticed an older white gentleman looking at me. Not staring, or stalking, or anything. He just had an inquisitive look. I paid it no mind, because I had things to do, and, quite frankly, I wasn’t in the mood to deal with it. While I was in line to pay for my groceries, the gentleman approached me. To my surprise, he me asked if I was William Wilson, and was my name “The Clothier” on Twitter. I said yes. He then shook my hand, said he follows me on Twitter and reads my blog. He went on to say he could not have appreciated me writing “How I see Racism In America” any more. He was furious about the verdict and could not even put that anger into words. He went on to say Zimmerman should never see the outside of a jail cell, and that he “hopes he burns in Hell”. I honestly thought he was gonna bust a blood vessel. He was more angry because some of the same black people he was siding with, were lumping him into the pro-Zimmerman camp. He was being lumped into something he didn’t remotely believe in, just because he was white. He appreciated me acknowledging that racism exists, while also stating that not all white people were racist. I told him thank you and proceeded with my check out. He then shocked me again by saying my money was “no good” and paid for my items. He then told the young man at the register to read the blog as well; and that I was a great role model. I needed that today. Not because of the money, but I needed to hear a rational voice after hearing so much anger and vitriol. God is good! Until next time….

God bless and dress well.

William Wilson,CEO

William Wilson Clothing

Follow William on Twitter: @TheClothier

How I See Racism In America

William Wilson ThinkingAbout 10 years ago, I met an elderly white woman that saw the welcoming reception I received when I went into a local sports bar I used to frequent called Coach’s. She called me over to her, and began to question me. She initially thought I was an athlete by the  reception. She’d never seen white people get up and walk across a room to say hello to a black man. When I told her I was just a guy that worked for a construction company, she began to cry. This threw me off, and I asked her what was wrong. She said she never thought she’d see the day that a young black man would be so welcomed at any establishment in Pineville, NC. This initially made me angry internally. I thought it upset her that the predominantly white bar accepted me. But her next words floored me. She said, “I marched in Selma AL with Dr. Martin Luther King.” She began to tell me how her sons were beat up on a daily basis for the parent’s beliefs that blacks should be treated equal. Her husband used to have to drive to Statesville to work because every time someone found out his view on equal rights, he’d get fired. (Statesville from Pineville is an hour drive NOW, I could imagine what it was before I-77). She said they had to buy paint 5 gallons at a time because people would come to their house at night and paint “Nigger Lovers live here” on their garage door. By the time she was done, we were both in tears. Until that point, I’d always only heard the black perspective of the civil rights movement. And it opened my eyes to a number of things in life, and gave me clarity. The lady died 2 months later. I was asked to attend the funeral and to ride in car with the family. I grew up a lot in those 2 months.

The Trayvon Martin verdict has brought out the best AND worst in our society. Some of the comments, remarks and feelings have been scathing to say the least. Race always polarizes us. Some don’t want to acknowledge it’s existence. Others place it as the blame where it is unwarranted. Though I don’t know if the verdict was racially motivated, but I personally have no doubt the catalyst of this tragic event was.

The reason I felt compelled to write this blog post this morning is based on some of the blanket statements I heard during discussions last night after the verdict. Unlike the post OJ verdict, I saw as many whites upset about the verdict as I did blacks. The people that felt “justice” was served was an infinitesimal. Yet I saw a number of people (black and white) that made blanket statements, like “White people don’t want to admit they’re racist.” or “Every time black people don’t get what they want they throw the race card.” There are no absolutes in life, except death.

Racism is alive and well, but with every generation it’s weakened more and more. Racism’s biggest asset are the older generations. The generations that witnessed/ experienced it first hand, in person. Unfortunately, many of these people are the ones that still make rules, legislation, hiring decisions, and the significant choices in society. They tend to not only be racist, they tend to also be sexist and homophobic. Again, not all of them, but some. But America is getting better in spite of them. I recently went to 2 comedy shows with black headliners, and the audience was almost 50/50, white to  black. That’s progress. When I was in high school, an interracial couple was practically a scandal, now it’s common place. That’s progress. I’ve seen young children playing, and having a great time. Then a Hispanic kid walks up, and the kids naturally acclimate him into their games. Then suddenly, the parents that just told their children they have another hour to play, suddenly have to leave.

Racism isn’t hereditary. It’s not instinctual. It’s taught. It’s passed down. It comes from experiences. The most racist people I have ever experienced seem to have never actually spent time getting to know the people they hate. It’s ignorance and lack of exposure. We are not that different. I hear white mothers with the same concerns as black mothers. Black fathers have the same concerns as white ones. The greatest weapons we have in the battle against racism is education and exposure. I’m the only black person many of my older white friends interact with. Chris Rock had a line that I found very funny, and fit MY life. “All my black friends have a bunch of white friends. All my white friends have 1 black friend.” America is getting better with each generation as far as race goes. And it will continue to get better, but it will never go away. That’s sad, but it’s true. All we can do is pray, and try to treat everyone the way we would like to be treated. If we do that, IT WILL GET BETTER. Then maybe we can vote in some people to Washington DC that an help us with this economy. Until next time……

God bless and dress well.

William Wilson, CEO

William Wilson Clothing

Follow William on Twitter: @theclothier